(iSeeCars) – It took 36.3 days for the average new vehicle to sell in January and 46.2 days for the average used vehicle, according to a recent study by car search engine iSeeCars.com. Even in today’s market with inventory constraints from the ongoing microchip shortage, there are certainly new and used cars that remain on dealer lots for an extended amount of time. 

These slow-sellers indicate that the supply is higher than the demand, which could be because the car is priced too high or because it isn’t as desirable as its competition. As a result, these vehicles can bring valuable negotiation opportunities to car shoppers because dealers will likely want to move them off the lot.

Which new and used cars are the slowest sellers? iSeeCars analyzed over 280,000 new and used cars sold in January to determine which vehicles remain on the market for the longest amount of time. 

Slowest-Selling New Cars

These are the top 10 slowest-selling new cars, which include a mix of vehicle types.

Slowest-Selling New Cars- iSeeCars.com – iSeeCars
RankVehicleAverage Days to SellAverage Price
1Lincoln Nautilus86.1$53,880
2Ford Edge72.9$41,393
3Chevrolet Silverado 150071.6$53,354
4Volkswagen Passat67.8$29,884
5Nissan Titan67.6$55,917
6Lincoln Navigator66.0$92,875
7Ford Mustang65.9$49,154
8GMC Sierra 150064.5$55,746
9Nissan Murano63.6$41,297
10Nissan Armada60.6$63,766
Overall Average36.3$42,104

The slowest-selling new car is the Lincoln Nautilus luxury midsize SUV, which takes 86.1 days to sell, and is followed by its mainstream counterpart, the Ford Edge. The Nautilus is among the least popular vehicles in the segment, which has led to rumors of its discontinuation after the 2023 model year, while the Edge saw a steep sales decline in 2021. A second Lincoln SUV, the Navigator also makes the list and takes 66 days to sell. The fully-redesigned 2022 Navigator has just entered production, which suggests that buyers are waiting for the updated model instead of buying leftover models from the 2021 model year.

Three pickup trucks make the list including the Chevrolet Silverado 1500, the Nissan Titan, and the GMC Sierra 1500. The Chevrolet Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 are getting redesigned for the 2022 model year, with the new versions entering the market in the spring of 2022. In the interim, General Motors released the Silverado 1500 Limited and the Sierra 1500 Limited for consumers who want 2022 model year trucks and don’t want to wait for the redesigned version. The slow-sellers are all leftover models from 2021, which suggests that buyers interested in these trucks are buying the Limited versions or waiting for the redesign. The Nissan Titan also makes the list and sells in the lowest volume of all pickup trucks in the full-size segment.

An additional pair of Nissans make the list: the Nissan Murano midsize SUV and the Nissan Armada full-size SUV. Both are among the lowest-volume sellers in their respective segments.

Slowest-Selling Used Cars

These are the top 10 slowest-selling used cars, which include a mix of vehicle types.

Slowest-Selling Used Cars – iSeeCars
RankVehicleAverage Days to SellAverage Price
1Lincoln Nautilus68.7$46,046
2Mercedes-Benz GLB64.9$47,135
3Ford Edge62.4$31,127
4Ford F-15061.2$43,505
5Volvo S6060.2$34,564
6Buick Envision59.6$30,882
7Ford Expedition59.2$52,962
8Toyota Avalon59.0$34,758
9Ford Expedition Max58.0$57,677
10Mercedes Benz C-Class57.2$38,340
Overall Average46.2$35,925

Ford-Lincoln models account for half the list including the Lincoln Nautilus, Ford Edge, Ford F-150, Ford Expedition, and Ford Expedition Max. Just like their new versions, the Lincoln Nautilus and Ford Edge are not in high demand as used vehicles. The Ford F-150 is the most popular vehicle in America, which suggests that the slow-selling versions are the model’s less desirable configurations. The Ford F-150 was also completely redesigned for 2021, so buyers may not want to pay high used car prices for an outdated version of the truck.

A pair of Mercedes vehicles make the list: the Mercedes-Benz GLB compact SUV and the Mercedes-Benz C-Class sedan. The Mercedes-Benz GLB was introduced for the 2020 model year and is among the lowest-priced options in the segment. The GLB has an average used car price of $47,135, while a new version has an MSRP between $38,600 to $49,950, making a new version a smarter purchase choice. The low demand for the C-Class is likely due to the dwindling popularity of the sedan segment.

When buying a new or used car, it’s not only important to understand how long a vehicle spends on dealer lots but also to understand why it is a slow-seller. Although these slower-selling cars can provide leverage for a bargain, consumers should do their research to understand why there isn’t high demand for these cars. This will ensure the issue is one they can overlook before they’re driving off the dealer lot. The iSeeCars free VIN check includes over 200 data points to equip car shoppers with the information necessary to make an informed car purchase, including how long a car has been on the market compared to its average selling time. 

About iSeeCars.com

iSeeCars.com is a car search engine that helps shoppers find the best car deals by providing key insights and valuable resources, like the iSeeCars free VIN check reports and Best Cars rankings. iSeeCars.com has saved users over $325 million so far by applying big data analytics powered by over 25 billion (and growing) data points and using proprietary algorithms to objectively analyze, score and rank millions of new cars and used cars.

This article, How to Get a Deal on Slow-Selling Cars, originally appeared on iSeeCars.com.