Carilion Clinic unveils new treatment for Carotid Artery Disease

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Carilion Clinic will be the first in this area to offer a new procedure that treats a disease that may lead to strokes. 

Officials announced Monday they will now offer the treatment for Carotid Artery Disease.

The clinic is the first in the region to offer the less invasive treatment called TransCarotid Artery Revascularization, or TCAR. , a hospital spokesman said. 

According to Carilion Clinic, Aortic Center Director, Joshua Adams, M.D., is the second physician in the state and the first in the region to offer this procedure.

“This innovative technique marks a paradigm shift from open procedures to more minimally invasive and hybrid approaches,” said Dr. Adams. “This is exciting because our communities are some of the first to have access to TCAR, which means patients won’t have to travel far to receive this cutting-edge care.”

The hospital released the following statement regarding how the procedure works: 

Instead of making a large incision along the artery, TCAR only requires a small incision just above the collarbone. This incision provides direct access to the artery, allowing surgeons to place a specialized sheath into the diseased area. 

The sheath is connected to a system that reverses blood flow in the artery. This protects the brain from fragments of plaque that may loosen during the procedure.
The blood is then filtered and returned through a second sheath to an artery above the thigh.

Once blood flow is reversed, surgeons deploy a stent in the artery to stabilize any plaque buildup and minimize the potential for a future stroke. After the stent is successfully placed, the blood flow reversal is turned off and blood flow to the brain resumes as normal. Patients are typically out of the hospital by the next day.

Two patients have had the procedure done within the past month at Carilion Roanoke Memorial Hospital. 

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